Abstract Submission and Registration

Although the booking system is currently closed due to reaching maximum capacity, as the conference dates have had to be changed, it is likely that some registered delegates (including presenters) will unfortunately no longer be able to join us. In this event, spaces will open up to new delegates so if you would like to be put on the waiting list, please get in touch with the organisers via the email address below. Please also indicate if you would like to submit an abstract: [email protected].

Abstracts

Abstracts for platform presentations and posters should be no more than 250 words, and not include references. Presentations slots will be 20 minutes; 15 minutes for the talk, and five minutes for questions. Please note that by submitting an abstract you are agreeing to abide by the MRC2020 Code of Conduct.

 

Platform presentation guidance

The format for platform presentations is the 'letterbox' or 16x9 ratio in Powerpoint. Presentations will be 20 minutes long, including 5 minutes for questions. You will be given countdown warnings at 5 minutes, 2 minutes, and when your time is up. To ensure smooth running of the conference for all delegates, please check the length of your talk in advance and stick within your alloted time slot.

 

Poster Guidance

Due to the dimensions of the poster boards at the Etches Collection, posters must be portrait, and A1 in size. (Posters larger than A1, or printed in landscape, will not fit on the boards). Posters will be attached to the boards using velcro tabs, which will be supplied by the conference organisers.

 

Session Themes

The conference will have several sessions across the two days. Proposed themes for these sessions are outlined below, however we welcome abstracts covering all aspects of marine reptiles, whether they slot into the following themes or not.

 

  • Recent Discoveries
  • Fieldwork, conservation, and preparation projects
  • The origins of Mesozoic marine reptiles
  • Taxonomy of fossil marine reptiles
  • Faunas of the Kimmeridge Clay
  • Diet, foodwebs, and predation
  • Extant marine reptiles as analogues: The physiology and diets of today’s
    marine reptiles
  • Fleshing out the bones: Palaeoart (2D and 3D)

 

If you have any questions, please get in touch with the organising committee: [email protected].